Behind the Curtain: An Interview with John Warren, Key Accounts Manager

Posted by EverCheck on January 31, 2020
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In three years, John Warren has taken on three roles, two of which have been entirely new to the company. Starting as a Client Success Manager, John quickly showed he had a knack not just for client relationship management, but partnership management.

Now, John serves as EverCheck’s first Key Accounts Manager, working with our enterprise clients to strategize new initiatives that align our roadmap with the business needs and goals of those we serve every day.

We recently sat down with John to talk about this new role as Key Accounts Manager, balancing this high-impact role with being a new father, and how empathy and gratitude serve as his guiding principles at work and in life.

 

Q | Three years ago you started as EverCheck’s Client Success Manager. In year two, you became EverCheck’s first Product Specialist. Today you serve as EverCheck’s new Key Accounts Manager. Tell us about your journey.

A | You know, coming into the software world after having worked mostly with non-profits before was a little intimidating. I remember even feeling in my first few months of working here that I might be in over my head. But once I learned and understood the software, my natural relationship-building instincts kicked in. No matter what role I’ve held or what industry I’ve been in, that’s always what I’ve relied on.

As a CSM, I truly loved working with my clients on day-to-day account management, but I was also reading between the lines. There were gaps, and a lot of those gaps could actually be solved for with some of our other services. Automated renewal reminders was a huge one, and we added that feature years after we started so some of our earlier clients weren’t taking full advantage of the solution. Through that process I began to realize that there was an opportunity for both us and our clients that we were missing - we weren’t doing a good enough job helping clients identify and solve for those gaps. That’s where the Product Specialist role came in. I pioneered that role and its sole purpose was to help clients maximize how they used our software and service.

Now, the Key Accounts Manager is similar in that I’m leveraging my strengths to pioneer an all-new and much needed-role here. We’re constantly evolving the product and service to meet the needs of the industry, and we have key partners who are leading the charge to move healthcare forward. I work intimately with these partners to grow together and ensure our goals are fully aligned.

 

Q | What’s it like to pioneer roles like you have?

A | It’s both empowering and intimidating. It’s empowering because I get to shape and define the role. It’s intimidating because there’s no roadmap. But I have the support of my team and the leadership here and I know success is the only option. We’re here to make healthcare work better and I stand behind that mission fully, no matter my role.

 

Q | Around the office, you’re known as our “Resident Talk Show Host” because of your friendly and positive personality. People often come to your desk when they need a boost or a reset. Where does your positive outlook come from?

A | I’ve always enjoyed encouraging others. It all comes down to recognizing the value in people. When you peel back the layers and realize we’re all the same - the same fears, the same joys - it helps you connect with that person on a human level. I try to put myself in other people’s shoes, whether it’s a client or someone on my team. I realize that my energy affects those around me, and I stay focused on what’s right and not what’s wrong.

 

“Knowing that we’re all in this together
makes me want to work as hard as I can.”


 

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Q | How do you strike a balance between working full-time and being a father and husband?

A | I’m learning to wrap my mind around going from ON to ON - meaning I have to be “on” at work and then I’m “on” at home as a dad and a husband. But when I pull-up in the driveway, I see my little girl Rylan peeking through the blinds - her excitement re-energizes me. It’s hard at times, of course, but it’s worth it.

I also meet with my mentor about once a week, to talk about life and work. He’s a successful businessman and he’s a husband and father, too. He gets it. He acts as a sounding board for me.

 

“I used to be hesitant about having a mentor,
but as I’m getting older I really see the value of having
someone to talk to who has been there and done that.”

 

Q | When Rylan sees you working as hard as you do, what kind of example are you hoping to set for her?

A | I want her to see the value of hard work, but I also want her to see her own unique value in how God made her. I want her to be able to identify the gifts and strengths that are unique to her. Understanding my own gifts has enabled me to find work that I’m good at and enjoy doing. Ultimately, I want her to be encouraged to pursue whatever her gifts allow her to do successfully and brings her joy.

 

Q | What’s playing in your headphones at work? What gets you through the day?

A | You’re not going to believe this. Explicit rap is my reset. I’ve been listening to a lot of Kevin Gates lately. My wife hates it.

 

Q | What’s something that’s been on your mind lately?

A | Sarah and I bought a home not long ago and it has been project after project. Right now, I’m trying to figure out how to move my water heater into my garage. But also - Rylan is about to turn 3! We’re trying to take her to Disney before then and really make an event out of it. I think she’s going to love it.

 

527658_400757599995520_579584404_nQ | What’s something people might be surprised to learn about you?

A | I’ve spent a lot of time in Africa doing mission work. I’d go to remote villages and sometimes I’d be the first outsider the village had ever seen. They loved touching my hair. But ultimately, that was some of the most fulfilling work I’ve done. I’m super grateful for that experience.

 

Q | Settle the ongoing office debate for us: skiing or snowboarding?

A | Snowboarding, for sure. If you can get past day one without a broken wrist, day two is awesome. You’ll be amazed at the progress you make by day two.

Posted in: EverCheck Culture